Scotland’s energy future with renewables not nuclear – Jo


“Scotland can become a global pioneer for clean, renewable energy” – Jo

Jo Swinson MP has urged the Government to invest in renewable energy and abandon moves towards new nuclear power.

Speaking in the House of Commons today, Jo asked Minister for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Margaret Beckett:

“Now that the bill for cleaning up nuclear is approaching £70bn, including £5.2bn for the 3 Scottish sites, would the Minister agree that instead of new nuclear power, money would be better spent on energy efficiency and renewables? Has the department undertaken any work internally to look at the cost-benefit of various energy options in reducing CO2 emissions, and if so what are its conclusions?”

Commenting after the debate, Jo said:

“Scotland is well placed to lead the way on investment in renewable energy sources. Through the combination of wind, wave, tidal and other sources, renewables offer huge potential for energy generation, job creation and economic growth in Scotland.

“Scotland has 25% of Europe’s wind energy resource, while the Pentland Firth has been described as the ‘Saudi Arabia of the future world tidal industry’. The Scottish Executive is making good progress towards the ambitious target of 40% of electricity generated in Scotland to be from renewables by 2020.

“Unlike renewable energy, there is little public support for nuclear power in Scotland. This demonstrates the wisdom of the Scottish people, who are not inclined towards funnelling billions of pounds into an expensive energy source, which produces waste that we don’t know how to deal with safely.

“With an ambitious approach to renewables, but also one that is balanced and takes account of all sources of renewable energy available, Scotland can become a global pioneer for clean, renewable energy.

“The Prime Minister is unwise to ignore both public opinion over nuclear and Scotland’s great potential for generating renewable energy as he presses ahead with his nuclear agenda.”


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